ECCLESIASTICAL MEMORIALS,
RELATING CHIEFLY TO RELIGION,
AND THE REFORMATION OF IT,


JOHN STRYPE

OXFORD, AT THE CLARENDON PRESS. MDCCCXXII. {1822}
VOL. III. PART I.

CHAP. XXXVIII. pp.489-490

anno 1556.
Two burnt at Bow;

And three at Smithfield.
On the 15th day, two tall men were carried in a cart from Newgate unto Stratford Bow to be burnt: the one blind, and the other lame: the one named Hugh Leveroke, a painter, dwelling in St. Swithin's-lane; and the other, that is, the blind man, dwelling in St. Thomas Apostle. And On the 16th, between nine and ten of the clock aforenoon, were three women, who were of Essex, carried unto Smithfield, to end their lives by fire.


P.494

Thirteen burnt.
The 27th of this June, eleven men and two women, thirteen in all, most of them of Essex, rode from Newgate unto Stratford Bow, in three carts, and there, at four posts, were all burnt for heresy. There were present near twenty thousand people, as was thought, to see the execution: whose ends generally in coming there, and to such like executions, were to strengthen themselves in the profession of the gospel, and to exhort and comfort those that were to die.


CHAP. XLVII. P.588

Anno 1556.
Another confession signed by thirteen martyrs.
365




Page 1739.



No. LXII, LXIII.
Thirteen persons were this year burnt together at Stratford Bow; who also subscribed a confession. The occasion whereof was this. Feckenham, dean of St. Paul's, had publicly in the pulpit at Paul's Cross, the Sunday after they were condemned, defamed them; by declaring, "that he had talked with them, and that they were all of different opinions. That there were sixteen of them, and that they were of sixteen sundry opinions." For this was one of the matters the Romanists used to boast of then, as well as of latter times, namely, their unity in doctrine, and the dissensions of Protestants. In vindication therefore of themselves, these good men, before their death, made a declaration of their faith, which is printed in Fox, and signed by sixteen. For so many were condemned by Bonner to be burnt. But Cardinal Pole sent his dispensation for the saving the lives of three of them, who had, it seems, recanted, and promised to submit to penance. Which dispensation being worth observing, is in the Catalogue. But besides this confession signed by the sixteen, there was another signed by those thirteen that were burnt; which being not printed in Fox's book, I have from a MS. transmitted into the same place; which agrees much with Clement's confession beforesaid.